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Monticello Community Historical Society
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OUR SITES


Refers to Site is on Federal Historic Register. (Virginia School)
Refers to Site is on local register.
Tour Stops refer to the Historic Monticello Driving and Biking Tour

Monticello Historical Station and Museum at Floyd Cline Hall
23860 W 83rd St, Shawnee, Kansas 66227
Stop #1
This modest building is a telling example of the courage and dedication of American volunteer fire departments. Until 1973, Monticello had agreements with the largely-volunteer Delaware Township, Wyandotte County, and the Shawnee Township Fire Departments that stated if they were able to service a call in the area they would. ... More


(Monticello) Union Cemetery
75th and Gleason, Shawnee
#2
In 1884, the Union Cemetery Company purchased five acres from F. L. and Mary C. Kueker for $275. Yet, with the oldest grave dating to 1860, these grounds were already known locally as a cemetery. ... More

Monticello Methodist Episcopal Church
23860 W. 75th St., Shawnee
#3
Currently United Methodist Church
In about 1850, a new Methodist Indian School, built about one half mile north of today’s church site, began to teach both Indian and White children. Methodist preachers conducted Sunday School and Camp meetings there on a regular basis. ... More

Virginia Schoolhouse (relocated)
7301 Mize Rd., Shawnee
#4
4a. Original Site of Virginia School, 1878. 71st & Clare, Shawnee.
Opened for class in January 1878, this schoolhouse soon became a center for culture and community for people of all ages. Besides being a home for grades 1-8, the little building housed religious services and a Sunday school. ... More


Additional Virginia School Fact Sheet.

“Wild Bill” Hickok Land Claim
8649 Clare Rd, Lenexa
#5
James Butler Hickok became one of Monticello’s first town constable in 1858 and later led a life of western adventures romanticized in print and Hollywood movies. “Wild Bill” Hickok was a slight man with long wavy hair and a bushy mustache. ... More


Monticello Cemetery
East on Church Rd on 73rd Terr, Shawnee
#6
First owned by John P. Campbell who received it as bounty land given to soldiers in 1855, this historic landscape reflects the public need for cemeteries on the frontier. In 1859, Campbell sold this parcel to Monticello Township for use as a pubic cemetery. ... More


Monticello Townsite - Township Hall
W 71st Terr and Brockway, Shawnee
#7
7a. Zarah Townsite, 1878.
Monticello was established in 1857 at the crossroads of the Midland Trail running from Westport, Missouri to Lawrence, Kansas and the Territorial Road linking Ft. Leavenworth and Paola. ... More


Round Prairie School (1879-1962)
21315 Johnson Dr., Shawnee
#8
Plaque located along sidewalk east of residence.



Garrett Farm and Park
21500-21705 W 47th Terr, Shawnee
#9
Samuel Garrett was an English stonemason who immigrated to the Monticello are in 1849. Four years later he married Betsey Captain, a Shawnee Indian. ... More

Chouteau Ferry Crossing/ Railroad Station
4506 Lakecrest Dr., Shawnee
#10
In the early 19th century, the famous Chouteau Family Agency of St. Louis operated trading posts along the Kaw River. Frederick Chouteau operated this ferry and trading post for trade with the Shawnee and Delaware tribes. ... More



Additional Chouteau Fact Sheet

Tiblow Ferry Crossing
Frisbie Rd and W 43rd St, Shawnee
#11
The Tiblow Ferry served as a critical link on the trail between Fort Leavenworth, Paola and Fort Scott. Henry Tiblow, was a Delaware Indian whose education and life say much about Indian “assimilation” and entrepreneurship in the 1860s. ... More


Town of Wilder, Kansas
W 47th St and Wilder Rd, Shawnee
#12
Wilder came to life in 1875 on land owned by Peter D. Cook. The new town promised great advantages including groves of trees, an excellent spring, a location two miles from the Tiblow Ferry, and a new train line connecting Kansas City and Topeka. ... More


Boles Cemetery
Clare Rd & W 54th St
#13
In 1860, the Reverend Charles L. Boles acquired 160-acres from the federal government. In 1863, with the death of Elizabeth Boles, he set aside one-half acre in the southeast corner of his land for burial purposes. ...More



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